The Co-Operettes began in 1923 when the wives of the Co-Operative Club members of Manhattan, Kansas organized the first auxiliary, called the ‘Co-Op Lassies’. In 1928, the Co-Operettes became a national organization

The Co-Operettes began in 1923 when the wives of the Co-Operative Club members of Manhattan, Kansas organized the first auxiliary, called the ‘Co-Op Lassies’. In 1928, the Co-Operettes became a national organization

Previously Unidentified, 101-Year-Old Film Footage Discovered in MoMA’s Collection Is The Earliest Known Feature Film Made with Black Actors
The Museum of Modern Art announces the discovery of previously unidentified, 101-year-old film footage, the earliest known surviving feature film with a cast of black actors. The unedited daily rushes—multiple “takes” shot each day during production—were found among a trove of 900 negatives from the pioneering Biograph Studio that were acquired by MoMA’s founding Film curator, Iris Barry, in 1939, just prior to their scheduled destruction following the closure of Biograph’s Bronx facilities. Though a few other movies from that period featuring black casts, such as William Foster’s The Pullman Porter (1913) and Hunter C. Haynes’s Uncle Remus’ First Visit to New York (1914) are known to have been filmed, all are considered lost. The discovery of the 1913 rushes launched a multiyear research project to identify the production, its actors, and its crew, led by Ron Magliozzi, Associate Curator, and Peter Williamson, Preservation Officer, Department of Film, MoMA. Selections from the film, along with research findings, archival materials, and film stills will go on view October 24, 2014, in the Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Lobby Galleries in the exhibition 100 Years in Post-Production: Resurrecting a Lost Landmark of Black Film History (through March 2015). The world premiere presentation of the assembled rushes will be on November 8, 2014, in MoMA’s annual film preservation festival To Save and Project (October 24–November 22, 2014), organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, and Dave Kehr, Adjunct Curator, with Sophie Cavoulacos, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film, MoMA
Starring the legendary Caribbean American musical theater performer and recording artist Bert Williams (1874–1922), the seven reels of untitled and unassembled rushes were filmed at virtually the same time that D. W. Griffith began The Birth of a Nation
In addition to narrative scenes, the reels reveal candid footage of the black cast and white crew interacting on set, and several frames of Williams mingling with white extras on a suburban street location during a break in filming. The rushes also provide nearly eight minutes of documentary footage of the interracial cast and crew on the New York studio sets and suburban New Jersey locations (in what is believed to be Englewood)
Zoom Info
Previously Unidentified, 101-Year-Old Film Footage Discovered in MoMA’s Collection Is The Earliest Known Feature Film Made with Black Actors
The Museum of Modern Art announces the discovery of previously unidentified, 101-year-old film footage, the earliest known surviving feature film with a cast of black actors. The unedited daily rushes—multiple “takes” shot each day during production—were found among a trove of 900 negatives from the pioneering Biograph Studio that were acquired by MoMA’s founding Film curator, Iris Barry, in 1939, just prior to their scheduled destruction following the closure of Biograph’s Bronx facilities. Though a few other movies from that period featuring black casts, such as William Foster’s The Pullman Porter (1913) and Hunter C. Haynes’s Uncle Remus’ First Visit to New York (1914) are known to have been filmed, all are considered lost. The discovery of the 1913 rushes launched a multiyear research project to identify the production, its actors, and its crew, led by Ron Magliozzi, Associate Curator, and Peter Williamson, Preservation Officer, Department of Film, MoMA. Selections from the film, along with research findings, archival materials, and film stills will go on view October 24, 2014, in the Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Lobby Galleries in the exhibition 100 Years in Post-Production: Resurrecting a Lost Landmark of Black Film History (through March 2015). The world premiere presentation of the assembled rushes will be on November 8, 2014, in MoMA’s annual film preservation festival To Save and Project (October 24–November 22, 2014), organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, and Dave Kehr, Adjunct Curator, with Sophie Cavoulacos, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film, MoMA
Starring the legendary Caribbean American musical theater performer and recording artist Bert Williams (1874–1922), the seven reels of untitled and unassembled rushes were filmed at virtually the same time that D. W. Griffith began The Birth of a Nation
In addition to narrative scenes, the reels reveal candid footage of the black cast and white crew interacting on set, and several frames of Williams mingling with white extras on a suburban street location during a break in filming. The rushes also provide nearly eight minutes of documentary footage of the interracial cast and crew on the New York studio sets and suburban New Jersey locations (in what is believed to be Englewood)
Zoom Info

Previously Unidentified, 101-Year-Old Film Footage Discovered in MoMA’s Collection Is The Earliest Known Feature Film Made with Black Actors

The Museum of Modern Art announces the discovery of previously unidentified, 101-year-old film footage, the earliest known surviving feature film with a cast of black actors. The unedited daily rushes—multiple “takes” shot each day during production—were found among a trove of 900 negatives from the pioneering Biograph Studio that were acquired by MoMA’s founding Film curator, Iris Barry, in 1939, just prior to their scheduled destruction following the closure of Biograph’s Bronx facilities. Though a few other movies from that period featuring black casts, such as William Foster’s The Pullman Porter (1913) and Hunter C. Haynes’s Uncle Remus’ First Visit to New York (1914) are known to have been filmed, all are considered lost. The discovery of the 1913 rushes launched a multiyear research project to identify the production, its actors, and its crew, led by Ron Magliozzi, Associate Curator, and Peter Williamson, Preservation Officer, Department of Film, MoMA. Selections from the film, along with research findings, archival materials, and film stills will go on view October 24, 2014, in the Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Lobby Galleries in the exhibition 100 Years in Post-Production: Resurrecting a Lost Landmark of Black Film History (through March 2015). The world premiere presentation of the assembled rushes will be on November 8, 2014, in MoMA’s annual film preservation festival To Save and Project (October 24–November 22, 2014), organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, and Dave Kehr, Adjunct Curator, with Sophie Cavoulacos, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film, MoMA

Starring the legendary Caribbean American musical theater performer and recording artist Bert Williams (1874–1922), the seven reels of untitled and unassembled rushes were filmed at virtually the same time that D. W. Griffith began The Birth of a Nation

In addition to narrative scenes, the reels reveal candid footage of the black cast and white crew interacting on set, and several frames of Williams mingling with white extras on a suburban street location during a break in filming. The rushes also provide nearly eight minutes of documentary footage of the interracial cast and crew on the New York studio sets and suburban New Jersey locations (in what is believed to be Englewood)

Gladys O’Donnell with her two children after returning home to Long Beach, California, September 1930 
O’Donnell won the Women’s Air Derby, flying 2,250 miles to Chicago in just over 15 hours. 

Gladys O’Donnell with her two children after returning home to Long Beach, California, September 1930 

O’Donnell won the Women’s Air Derby, flying 2,250 miles to Chicago in just over 15 hours. 

natgeofound:

Two young girls enjoy the sun relaxing in their suits and wraps in England, September 1929. Photograph by Bernard Wakeman, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Two young girls enjoy the sun relaxing in their suits and wraps in England, September 1929. Photograph by Bernard Wakeman, National Geographic

St James Parish - Class of 1925 - St Louis, Missouri 
Students 28 (14 boys and 14 girls)
Top Row - William Corbett, John Fannen, Bernard Thiele, Renard Gruner, Frank Strathman, John Doering, Maurice Sullivan, Orvad Harnes, Norman Fehrensen, Joseph Hussman
Second Row - Angelo Pilla, Emmet Jones, Regina Bernsen, M. Hester Bovard, Mary McCauley, Estelle Coad, Evelyn Lutz, Loraine Lutz, Joseph Phelan, Waldo Bisso
Front Row - Sylvia Blazitz, Rosalie May, Rose Gioia, Dorothy Brady, Reverend P.J. O’Connor, Dolores Brady, Margaret M. Huff, Lillian Saxton, Christina Hobbs

St James Parish - Class of 1925 - St Louis, Missouri 

Students 28 (14 boys and 14 girls)

Top Row - William Corbett, John Fannen, Bernard Thiele, Renard Gruner, Frank Strathman, John Doering, Maurice Sullivan, Orvad Harnes, Norman Fehrensen, Joseph Hussman

Second Row - Angelo Pilla, Emmet Jones, Regina Bernsen, M. Hester Bovard, Mary McCauley, Estelle Coad, Evelyn Lutz, Loraine Lutz, Joseph Phelan, Waldo Bisso

Front Row - Sylvia Blazitz, Rosalie May, Rose Gioia, Dorothy Brady, Reverend P.J. O’Connor, Dolores Brady, Margaret M. Huff, Lillian Saxton, Christina Hobbs