Edith Houghton, former baseball prodigy and MLB’s first female scout, dies at 100
Houghton was only ten years old when she joined The Philadelphia Bobbies [our favorite baseball team ever, obviously!!] - a factory team made up of women, all of whom bobbed their hair. ‘The Kid’ was so small that she had to tighten her cap with a safety pin and use a pen knife to punch new holes in the belt of her uniform pants. But Philadelphia sports reporters consistently praised both her hitting and fielding—at one time or another she played every position on the field
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Edith Houghton, former baseball prodigy and MLB’s first female scout, dies at 100
Houghton was only ten years old when she joined The Philadelphia Bobbies [our favorite baseball team ever, obviously!!] - a factory team made up of women, all of whom bobbed their hair. ‘The Kid’ was so small that she had to tighten her cap with a safety pin and use a pen knife to punch new holes in the belt of her uniform pants. But Philadelphia sports reporters consistently praised both her hitting and fielding—at one time or another she played every position on the field
Zoom Info
Edith Houghton, former baseball prodigy and MLB’s first female scout, dies at 100
Houghton was only ten years old when she joined The Philadelphia Bobbies [our favorite baseball team ever, obviously!!] - a factory team made up of women, all of whom bobbed their hair. ‘The Kid’ was so small that she had to tighten her cap with a safety pin and use a pen knife to punch new holes in the belt of her uniform pants. But Philadelphia sports reporters consistently praised both her hitting and fielding—at one time or another she played every position on the field
Zoom Info

Edith Houghton, former baseball prodigy and MLB’s first female scout, dies at 100

Houghton was only ten years old when she joined The Philadelphia Bobbies [our favorite baseball team ever, obviously!!] - a factory team made up of women, all of whom bobbed their hair. ‘The Kid’ was so small that she had to tighten her cap with a safety pin and use a pen knife to punch new holes in the belt of her uniform pants. But Philadelphia sports reporters consistently praised both her hitting and fielding—at one time or another she played every position on the field