Showing posts tagged Dance

no one wants to cut in on this dance with Colleen Moore [in this unidentified film]

no one wants to cut in on this dance with Colleen Moore [in this unidentified film]

have a ball this weekend!!

Ball at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts, January 11, 1936 [via]

have a ball this weekend!!

Ball at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts, January 11, 1936 [via]

Shirley Temple, pretty as a picture, is trying to make up her mind as to whose dance is next. Scene is the formal commencement ball of the California Military Academy of Los Angeles, Shirley’s first formal since her voluntary ‘retirement’.  photograph dated July 8, 1940

Shirley Temple, pretty as a picture, is trying to make up her mind as to whose dance is next. Scene is the formal commencement ball of the California Military Academy of Los Angeles, Shirley’s first formal since her voluntary ‘retirement’.  photograph dated July 8, 1940

as seen in MoMA’s excellent Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000 exhibit
centuryofthechild:

Times Wide World Photos. “A Famous School of Dance Has a Birthday,” class at an Isadora Duncan dance school. 1929
A quasimystical belief in the psychological and therapeutic power of expressive movement inspired pioneers of modern dance education in Europe and the United States, among them Isadora Duncan and Margaret Morris, each of whom established private schools for children. Classes were frequently conducted outdoors, and emphasized a natural athleticism. Touring troupes of scantily clad girls trained by Duncan performed with bare feet and loose hair, causing a public sensation before and after World War I.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

as seen in MoMA’s excellent Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000 exhibit

centuryofthechild:

Times Wide World Photos. “A Famous School of Dance Has a Birthday,” class at an Isadora Duncan dance school. 1929

A quasimystical belief in the psychological and therapeutic power of expressive movement inspired pioneers of modern dance education in Europe and the United States, among them Isadora Duncan and Margaret Morris, each of whom established private schools for children. Classes were frequently conducted outdoors, and emphasized a natural athleticism. Touring troupes of scantily clad girls trained by Duncan performed with bare feet and loose hair, causing a public sensation before and after World War I.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Ball of Dramatic Authors’ Association in the Hotel Europe, Warsaw, Poland, 1929
group photo of participants of the ball. Visible include: solicitor Kuratowski (third from left in the first place), actress Mila Kaminska (fifth from left in the first place), actress Sophia Lindorf (eighth from the left in the first place), playwright John Adolf Hertz (in the foreground of right), writer Vaclav Grubinski (second from left in second row), playwright Zygmunt Kawecki (by Mila Kaminska), journalist Stefan Krzywoszewski (right next to Sigmund Kawckiego), actor Joseph Wegrzyn (second from right in second row), the poet Marian Hemar (far right in second row, with a mustache), a painter Vincent Drabik (first from left in back row), a painter Wladyslaw Skoczylas (the last row, third from left) and director Prusiński (right on the last step of the stairs) and his wife (third from left in the first place)

Ball of Dramatic Authors’ Association in the Hotel Europe, Warsaw, Poland, 1929

group photo of participants of the ball. Visible include: solicitor Kuratowski (third from left in the first place), actress Mila Kaminska (fifth from left in the first place), actress Sophia Lindorf (eighth from the left in the first place), playwright John Adolf Hertz (in the foreground of right), writer Vaclav Grubinski (second from left in second row), playwright Zygmunt Kawecki (by Mila Kaminska), journalist Stefan Krzywoszewski (right next to Sigmund Kawckiego), actor Joseph Wegrzyn (second from right in second row), the poet Marian Hemar (far right in second row, with a mustache), a painter Vincent Drabik (first from left in back row), a painter Wladyslaw Skoczylas (the last row, third from left) and director Prusiński (right on the last step of the stairs) and his wife (third from left in the first place)