no one wants to cut in on this dance with Colleen Moore [in this unidentified film]

no one wants to cut in on this dance with Colleen Moore [in this unidentified film]

Sing-song girls, aged between 8-10 years, in training at a teahouse to entertain men during dinners with song, dance and recitation, Beijing, China, early 1930s 
photos by Ellen Thorbecke
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Sing-song girls, aged between 8-10 years, in training at a teahouse to entertain men during dinners with song, dance and recitation, Beijing, China, early 1930s 
photos by Ellen Thorbecke
Zoom Info

Sing-song girls, aged between 8-10 years, in training at a teahouse to entertain men during dinners with song, dance and recitation, Beijing, China, early 1930s 

photos by Ellen Thorbecke


Looks like a jitterbug routine! Ken Murray and Rita Hayworth have fun at a cocktail party given the other afternoon at The Victor Hugo, located at 233 North Beverly Drive. photograph dated June 13, 1940

Looks like a jitterbug routine! Ken Murray and Rita Hayworth have fun at a cocktail party given the other afternoon at The Victor Hugo, located at 233 North Beverly Drive. photograph dated June 13, 1940

as seen in MoMA’s excellent Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000 exhibit
centuryofthechild:

Times Wide World Photos. “A Famous School of Dance Has a Birthday,” class at an Isadora Duncan dance school. 1929
A quasimystical belief in the psychological and therapeutic power of expressive movement inspired pioneers of modern dance education in Europe and the United States, among them Isadora Duncan and Margaret Morris, each of whom established private schools for children. Classes were frequently conducted outdoors, and emphasized a natural athleticism. Touring troupes of scantily clad girls trained by Duncan performed with bare feet and loose hair, causing a public sensation before and after World War I.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

as seen in MoMA’s excellent Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000 exhibit

centuryofthechild:

Times Wide World Photos. “A Famous School of Dance Has a Birthday,” class at an Isadora Duncan dance school. 1929

A quasimystical belief in the psychological and therapeutic power of expressive movement inspired pioneers of modern dance education in Europe and the United States, among them Isadora Duncan and Margaret Morris, each of whom established private schools for children. Classes were frequently conducted outdoors, and emphasized a natural athleticism. Touring troupes of scantily clad girls trained by Duncan performed with bare feet and loose hair, causing a public sensation before and after World War I.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild