fixedsash:

I really like this shot. It has a summer fun element to it that is classic. Sadly, I don’t recognize any of these folks. My guess is that maybe they lived in Hornsbyville (looking at that country-esque setting in the background), which was that Polish immigrant town I mentioned in my previous post.

fixedsash:

I really like this shot. It has a summer fun element to it that is classic. Sadly, I don’t recognize any of these folks. My guess is that maybe they lived in Hornsbyville (looking at that country-esque setting in the background), which was that Polish immigrant town I mentioned in my previous post.

Sunday school class on the steps of 1st Presbyterian Church in Eagle Rock. Pictured are approximately 52 children, both boys and girls of various ages, as well as seven female teachers sitting in the back row. The church was established on March 5, 1914 and was first occupied on Easter Sunday, April 4, 1915. It later became the Creswell Hall and eventually succumbed to demolition in 1962 or 1963. Eagle Rock is a neighborhood in northeastern Los Angeles that derives its name from a massive boulder at the district’s northern edge, which contains an indentation that casts a vaguely bird-shaped shadow on the rock at certain times of day. In 1906 Eagle Rock became an independent city and was incorporated in 1911 with a population of approximately 600; in 1920, population had grown to 2,250. Just one year later, in 1921, this figure had leaped to 3,800, and by 2005, the U.S. census estimated the population at approximately 27,875 [via]

Sunday school class on the steps of 1st Presbyterian Church in Eagle Rock. Pictured are approximately 52 children, both boys and girls of various ages, as well as seven female teachers sitting in the back row. The church was established on March 5, 1914 and was first occupied on Easter Sunday, April 4, 1915. It later became the Creswell Hall and eventually succumbed to demolition in 1962 or 1963. Eagle Rock is a neighborhood in northeastern Los Angeles that derives its name from a massive boulder at the district’s northern edge, which contains an indentation that casts a vaguely bird-shaped shadow on the rock at certain times of day. In 1906 Eagle Rock became an independent city and was incorporated in 1911 with a population of approximately 600; in 1920, population had grown to 2,250. Just one year later, in 1921, this figure had leaped to 3,800, and by 2005, the U.S. census estimated the population at approximately 27,875 [via]